Phototherapy- Archive

Phototherapy, Light and Health – All Posts

Increasingly the health benefits of light are being appreciated and verified in the scientific literature. Whilst many people know that ultraviolet produces vitamin D in the skin, few realise that for much of the day and most of the year the sunlight contains too little UVB to make vitamin D. Recent research shows that ultraviolet light also releases nitric oxide and reduces blood pressure. The harmful effects of ultraviolet light are mitigated by certain foods that protect the skin. Finally, visible light, and especially red light is proving to have remarkable healing effects on the skin, hair, muscles, brain and eyes.


Red light phototherapy (3/3): Hair regrowth, Pain reduction, Wound healing and Practical applications (10/9/2016) - In part 3 we look at NASAs original work on red light and pain reduction, recent discoveries about wound healing, and finish with a range of simple things you can do to benefit from red-light at home. Continue reading
Red light phototherapy (2/3): Brain, Muscles and Eyes (9/10/2016) - Red light stimulates mitochondrial function. We look at the accumulating evidence that phototherapy can improve brain function in Alzheimer's, schizophrenia and Parkinson's. Plus red light enhances muscle endurance and a has major role in eye health. Continue reading
Red light phototherapy (1/3): The Skin (8/25/2016) - Research is uncovering a huge range of beneficial effects of red light. In part 1 I look at the remarkable protective effects of red light on the skin. Continue reading
Why April 15th is D-Day in the south of England (4/12/2015) - To get your vitamin D levels up you need to get out in the sun at the right time of day. Continue reading
Animal products that protect you from UV damage (11/2/2014) - Evidence that compounds in a range of animal products can protect the skin from UV damage and cancer. Continue reading
Human photosynthesis – beyond vitamin D (11/2/2014) - New evidence demonstrates that sunshine on the skin synthesises nitric oxide, leading to significant cardiovascular benefits. Continue reading
Seventh Food & Health Group Meeting – Vitamin D (8/12/2013) - By contrived coincidence our vitamin D talk was held on the Summer Solstice June 21st. In the first set of slides, above, we look at the role of vitamin D in the body, vitamin D status – as indicated by the levels of … Continue reading

Recent Posts

The bitter truth is sweeter than we thought

Cocktail bitters like Angostura and Peychaud’s have pedigrees going back to the 1830’s. Looking like something out of a victorian apothecary these intriguing botanical preparations may indeed have medicinal properties deeper than anyone thought.

Following our recent infographic (Health Hack #1: An alternative to fizzy drinks) in which I recommended using Angostura bitters as a basis for a healthy fizzy drink, I felt I had more to say about bitters in general.

In traditional herbal medicine bitter herbs were considered aids to digestion through stimulation of bile and digestive juices. Taken fifteen minutes before a meal they were used to increase appetite –  the concept behind the idea of the aperitif – or after a meal as a digestive, but they are also thought to stimulate and ‘detoxify’ the liver, and generally are considered a ‘tonic’ to revivify the blood and to ‘enhance the vigour’ of the digestive system. Such vague and ill-defined terminology has led to these claims being largely dismissed. However, recent research is not only confirming the health value of bitter tasting substances but discovering that they have important physiological effects throughout the body.

The story of herbal bitters just took a fascinating turn that is proving to be sweeter than anyone might have imagined …

Read time: 12 minutes (2300 words) Continue reading

  1. Health Hack #1: An alternative to fizzy drinks Leave a reply
  2. June 2017 News Round-Up Leave a reply
  3. Even in the land of barbies and beer vegetarians DON’T live longer Leave a reply
  4. Gary Taubes on American Heart Association confirmation bias Leave a reply
  5. Giant Puff Ball with Garlic and Rosemary 7 Replies
  6. Low fat (but not full fat) dairy associated with increased risk of Parkinson’s disease Leave a reply
  7. May News Round-Up Leave a reply