Evolution and Diet – Archive

Evolution and Diet – All Posts

Neanderthal Herbal Medicine - Recent evidence has uncovered the use of herbal medicines amongst our closest evolutionary cousin. We look at the therepeutic properties of these herbs. Continue reading
The Waterside Ape on BBC Radio 4 - Listen Again: an excellent introduction into controversial theory that humans evolved in riverside / shoreline environments. Continue reading
GUEST POST from Miki Ben-Dor: “Big brains needed carbs” (???) - Miki Ben-Dor from Tel Aviv University brings his expertise of paleo-anthropology to bear on the question of whether cooked starches drove human evolution. Continue reading
Did cooked tubers drive human evolution? - Recent claims that starchy tubers drove human brain evolution are put under the microscope. Studies of the Hadza suggest otherwise. Continue reading
Seafood, Sex and Evolution (3 videos) - Watch our recent public talk on the role of seafood in brain health, evolution and female sexiness. (Three videos) Continue reading
Milk & Alcohol – was the good Doctor on to something? - Milk and alcohol - which featured in Dr Feelgood's 1978 hit of the same name - have opposing effects on gut health. Continue reading
Why were ancient teeth healthier than ours? - Unpicking the complexities of how human oral health changed with the advent of agriculture. Continue reading
Marrow Bones - Cheap, delicious and nutritious. Bone marrow was a key Palaeolithic food. Continue reading
'Born to Run' COver image, (c) Nature, Nov. 2004 (link to article) Endurance Running and Superior Throwing Provide Evidence of Man’s Evolutionary Diet - Humans are the best long distance runners in the animal kingdomand have superior throwing ability Continue reading
Man the Hunter - About 2 million year's ago the human brain began an exponential growth in size, unparalleled in the animal kingdom. What propelled this remarkable development? Continue reading

Recent Posts

Oxtail Caserole, country style

✓Gluten-free ✓Grain-free ✓Sugar free ✓Low-carb ✓Cow-Dairy-free

This dish was incredibly easy to make, and super delicious to eat! What more can one desire when it comes to food?

The Ox tail was from Goodwood Farm and consisted of all different sizes, as you would expect, from the tail of the animal. There was thick fat round one side of the larger pieces, which can be seen in these photos, and it tasted very good indeed. Real melt-in-the-mouth fat, not chewy tough stuff at all. And all I had to do was chuck it in some hot ghee (which is great for high heat cooking as it doesn’t burn, as butter would. See how I make ghee here), add some carrot and celery sticks, some red wine and bone broth, and, Bob’s your uncle, dinner! I didn’t have much time that evening so just flung some cauliflower in a pan to accompany this classic dish, and it was a perfect match.

  • About a kilo or so of oxtail (which, at Goodwood’s wholesale prices is only £4 per kilo, or Waitrose – not organic though – £6.99 per kilo)
  • Two or three large onions, chopped
  • A handful of organic carrots, cut into thick batons
  • A few sticks of organic celery, cut into thick batons
  • Ghee – a large chunk

Season the oxtail chunks with plenty of salt and pepper. In a large cast iron pan heat the ghee, add onions and gently fry for 5 minutes. Add the seasoned pieces of oxtail, gradually turning them as they brown. Sling in the carrots and celery, and let them feel the heat for some minutes, moving it all around slowly. Crack open a jar of bone broth (I must write up how to make this… watch this space) and add it to the pan, then chuck in a glass or two of organic red wine. Stir. Cover with the lid and pop the pot in the oven at about 140°C and leave for a couple of hours.

Done.

Gone!

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