Environment and Food Production – Archive

Environment and Food Production – All Posts

Many people are concerned not only to be eating a diet that is healthy for them, but one that is sustainable and environmentally sound for the planet as a whole. There has been an assumption that vegan diets have the lowest environmental impact, but there is considerable evidence that permanent pasture offers greater environmental benefits including biodiversity, whilst protecting the soil from the destruction of the plough. Furthermore, home grown food from vegetable gardens, allotments and smallholdings is often more productive than industrial scale farming.

Articles in this section explore some of these fascinating ideas.


Hold fire on the Sea Bass recipe! (Retraction and Apology) (15/Oct/16) - Breaking news: Scientists say Wild Sea Bass stocks are dangerously low. DO NOT EAT SEA BASS - use one of these sustainable alternatives Continue reading
Study: dairy, not plant based diets is the best way to feed the planet (14/May/16) - New Zealand farm analysis finds that mixed dairy/cropping systems feed the greatest number of people. Protein considerations prove pivotal. Continue reading
United Nations University Logo The United Nations University has published one of our blog posts! (28/Mar/15) - take a look at it here [UPDATE: Now also reblogged at Resilience] Continue reading
Chalk Valley Eaterie store front Pasture fed meat comes to the high street (16/Mar/15) - Afifah discovers a burger-bar in Southampton, who's farmer-owner wants to make ancestral nutrition available to everyone. Continue reading
Why home-grown food is up to ten times better than arable crops (20/Feb/15) - Study shows that UK allotments and gardens are more productive and fertile than farmland. Continue reading
Pannage pig in the New Forest Pork – tradition and nutrition (8/Feb/15) - Following her appearance on BBC4's Any Questions, Afifah looks at the nutritional value of pork. She reports on little-known health benefits, even for bacon. Continue reading
A pretty amazing food just got a whole lot prettier (7/Dec/14) - Wow! Our local organic egg farm has just started offering these beautiful multi-coloured hens eggs! Continue reading
Safari in deepest Sussex – now you can experience the Knepp re-wilding project for yourself! (19/Jul/14) - From glamping in a sepherd's hut to night safaris led by bat experts - Knepp estate now offers many ways to experience the UK's top re-wilding success story. Continue reading
Desertification – Agriculture’s Inevitable Destination? (6/Dec/13) - research from the University of Colorado shows how soil microbes have been decimated by agriculture. Continue reading
Re-wilding Our Food (2/Sep/13) - The re-wilding project at Knepp Castle in West Sussex is a pioneering example of using farm animals to maximise biodiversity. Continue reading

Recent Posts

Oxtail Caserole, country style

✓Gluten-free ✓Grain-free ✓Sugar free ✓Low-carb ✓Cow-Dairy-free

This dish was incredibly easy to make, and super delicious to eat! What more can one desire when it comes to food?

The Ox tail was from Goodwood Farm and consisted of all different sizes, as you would expect, from the tail of the animal. There was thick fat round one side of the larger pieces, which can be seen in these photos, and it tasted very good indeed. Real melt-in-the-mouth fat, not chewy tough stuff at all. And all I had to do was chuck it in some hot ghee (which is great for high heat cooking as it doesn’t burn, as butter would. See how I make ghee here), add some carrot and celery sticks, some red wine and bone broth, and, Bob’s your uncle, dinner! I didn’t have much time that evening so just flung some cauliflower in a pan to accompany this classic dish, and it was a perfect match.

  • About a kilo or so of oxtail (which, at Goodwood’s wholesale prices is only £4 per kilo, or Waitrose – not organic though – £6.99 per kilo)
  • Two or three large onions, chopped
  • A handful of organic carrots, cut into thick batons
  • A few sticks of organic celery, cut into thick batons
  • Ghee – a large chunk

Season the oxtail chunks with plenty of salt and pepper. In a large cast iron pan heat the ghee, add onions and gently fry for 5 minutes. Add the seasoned pieces of oxtail, gradually turning them as they brown. Sling in the carrots and celery, and let them feel the heat for some minutes, moving it all around slowly. Crack open a jar of bone broth (I must write up how to make this… watch this space) and add it to the pan, then chuck in a glass or two of organic red wine. Stir. Cover with the lid and pop the pot in the oven at about 140°C and leave for a couple of hours.

Done.

Gone!

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