Oxtail Caserole, country style

✓Gluten-free ✓Grain-free ✓Sugar free ✓Low-carb ✓Cow-Dairy-free

This dish was incredibly easy to make, and super delicious to eat! What more can one desire when it comes to food?

The Ox tail was from Goodwood Farm and consisted of all different sizes, as you would expect, from the tail of the animal. There was thick fat round one side of the larger pieces, which can be seen in these photos, and it tasted very good indeed. Real melt-in-the-mouth fat, not chewy tough stuff at all. And all I had to do was chuck it in some hot ghee (which is great for high heat cooking as it doesn’t burn, as butter would. See how I make ghee here), add some carrot and celery sticks, some red wine and bone broth, and, Bob’s your uncle, dinner! I didn’t have much time that evening so just flung some cauliflower in a pan to accompany this classic dish, and it was a perfect match.

  • About a kilo or so of oxtail (which, at Goodwood’s wholesale prices is only £4 per kilo, or Waitrose – not organic though – £6.99 per kilo)
  • Two or three large onions, chopped
  • A handful of organic carrots, cut into thick batons
  • A few sticks of organic celery, cut into thick batons
  • Ghee – a large chunk

Season the oxtail chunks with plenty of salt and pepper. In a large cast iron pan heat the ghee, add onions and gently fry for 5 minutes. Add the seasoned pieces of oxtail, gradually turning them as they brown. Sling in the carrots and celery, and let them feel the heat for some minutes, moving it all around slowly. Crack open a jar of bone broth (I must write up how to make this… watch this space) and add it to the pan, then chuck in a glass or two of organic red wine. Stir. Cover with the lid and pop the pot in the oven at about 140°C and leave for a couple of hours.

Done.

Gone!

Neanderthal Herbal Medicine

Our closest, extinct, cousins the Neanderthals are often thought of as thuggish and unsophisticated, but evidence over the last decade has began to challenge this picture, indicating that they had a broad range of skills, knowledge and, yes, sensitivity.

There is a lot of evidence from bone assemblages that Neanderthals often behaved as top predators, hunting a wide range of animals including deer, rhinoceroses, bisons and even brown bear. In this pursuit they were highly skilled and more successful than hyenas with whom they competed, indicating a high level of strategic intelligence and cooperation.

  • Read more about Neanderthal hunting prowess here: ScienceDaily

As well as a good knowledge of animal behaviour Neanderthals also used botanical material. Skeletons excavated in the 1950’s from Shanidar cave in northern Iraq indicate that Neanderthals buried their dead with flowers. These skeletons also showed evidence of injuries that had been tended and healed indicating that the sick and wounded had been cared for effectively. Continue reading

Jordan Peterson on Diet and Health

Jordan Peterson (born 1962) is a Canadian clinical psychologist and tenured professor of psychology at the University of Toronto. His research interests include self-deception, mythology, religion, narrative, neuroscience, personality, deception, creativity, intelligence, and motivation. He is a highly cited and respected researcher in his field.

Recently, and much to his own surprise, Peterson has become an internet sensation, appearing all over the alternative media where he is challenging the contemporary narrative on ‘social justice’, free speech and atheism.

He does this with such clarity and insight that his YouTube videos have quickly racked up millions of hits and he has been sought-after for interviews with alternative news shows such as Stefan Molyneux’s FreeDomain Radio, The Rubin Report and The Saad Truth, all of which are intelligent, thought provoking sites, which I also recommend.

To this new-found audience Peterson has brought a much needed paradigm shift in many areas of previously intransigent and polarised debate. In other words, he’s just my kind of man! If you have not heard him speak then I would recommend starting here (over 2 hrs long) or for here for a juicy 20 minute excerpt. His students really rate him, and I am sure you will see why if you listen to the longer interviews above.

The main purpose of this post, however, is to share some specific points that Peterson has recently made on diet and health as they are surprisingly concordant with the approach we advocate on this blog. I’ve selected the relevant clips from his recent live stream Q&A session below.

Peterson recommending regular sleep to improve circadian rhythms, as well as a protein and fat rich breakfast (2 min clip)…

Peterson explaining how a paleo diet helped his daughter and him improve their health (3 min clip)…

Peterson returns to the subject of diet and how his views on it changed (3 min clip)…

There! Isn’t he a good ‘un?

Please do watch the other videos of this man, his new found Rock Star status is justified on the basis of intellectual depth, breadth and honesty. What’s not to like?

March News Round-Up

Happy Easter!

Ten reasons why you should eat chocolate

Lets start off with some good news! The Mail Online (Mar 25th) makes the case for eating chocolate. We have covered most of their points before, but it doesn’t hurt to remind yourself of the health benefits. Our message: for the greatest benefit make sure its dark chocolate (70% cocoa solids or higher). Oh, and if you suffer with acne, then you might be better making your Lent abstinence permanent.

Continue reading

Aloe vera plants – why every home should have one

aloe-vera-plant

We always have a few Aloe vera plants growing in our house. They are easy to look after, drought tolerant succulents that do best in a sunny window but are surprisingly adaptable to lower light levels too.

Aloe is often touted for it’s health and beauty functions, from skin cleansing to collagen support when ingested. However, the stand out function, and the reason I make sure I always have a plant in my house, is for treating burns.

When it comes to first aid when someone has been burned or scalded, nothing beats Aloe vera. The standard hospital treatment for burns is silver sulfadiazine cream. Indeed medical students are taught that silver sulfadiazine is the most effective treatment for minor burns, but this is simply not true. Another common burns treatment is Nitrofurazone, but again this standard of care is beaten hands down by aloe vera. The published literature shows that there are many superior treatments, and aloe vera frequently comes out top. Here is what just a small selection of such studies found:

  • These results clearly demonstrated the greater efficacy of aloe cream over silver sulfadiazine cream for treating second-degree burns. [Khorasani, 2009]
  • Thermal burns patients dressed with Aloe Vera gel showed advantage compared to those dressed with silver sulfadiazine regarding early wound epithelialization, earlier pain relief and cost-effectiveness. [Shahzad, 2013]
  • Speed of healing was better in aloe vera group than silver sulfadiazine… In terms of wound surface area maximal improvement was observed… in the second degree wound of aloe vera. [Akhoondinasab, 2015]
  • In patients treated with Aloe Vera gel, epithelialization and granulation tissue of burn wounds were remarkably earlier than those patients treated with nitrofurazone [Irani, 2016]

So, how would I use Aloe vera with a burn?

It depends on the severity of the burn, but essentially I always try to cool down the site first, with cold water if available, for a good few seconds/minute then I find my Aloe plant and with a clean damp cloth I clean a leaf to remove dust, which can easily be present, then I either cut just the tip off the leaf and dab the cut end on the burn to get some of the clear gelatinous contents of the leaf directly on it, or, if the burn is more extensive I will cut the whole leaf off the plant near the base, with a clean sharp knife. I then lie the leaf on a chopping board and cut off the tooth-like serrations down both edges. Then I slit the whole leaf open, revealing a trove of cool, kind, healing jelly which can be removed with the knife or a spoon and applied directly to the burn or scald.

Scalds: an accidental n=1 trial

On one occasion I poured boiling water onto three fingers of one hand and was convinced I would have very serious and painful blisters the next day. However, I quickly took three finger length leaves off a plant, cut them in half lengthwise and encasing each of my very painful and hurt fingers in a leaf, like three finger puppets, lightly fixing them in place with elastic bands. I kept them on over night (a bit awkward, but I managed). Incredibly, in the morning my fingers were very nearly normal! This astonished me as I had on a previous occasion, some years earlier, managed to similarly scald a finger with boiling water and even though I kept it in cold water all day, I didn’t use aloe. On that occasion my finger was extremely painful for many days afterwards, and it resulted in my nail growing deformed for a time. The Aloe vera was SO much more effective, and the pain vastly reduced.

Sunburn

For sunburn Aloe is a real workhorse. Try not to get sunburnt in the first place, but if you do, simply prepare a leaf as I have described above, trimming off the sharp thorns first, cutting the leaf in half lengthwise, and rubbing the opened up gel onto the shoulders/forehead/thighs or wherever is sore. It works as an ‘after sun’ treatment even if you have not burnt. Skin just loves Aloe vera!

Tongue burns

Coffee too hot? Soup scalded your tongue? Aloe vera to the rescue! A burnt tongue can interfere with eating for days afterwards, so the quicker you can heal it the better. Just wipe any dust off your chosen Aloe vera leaf, cut the tip off, or the next bit down if you have already used the tip, and dab the jelly onto your poor tongue. Hold it outside your mouth for as many seconds as you can manage (which won’t be many) and then carry on, swallow it, re-apply a couple of times if you can, then try to forget the burn. Although you might be aware of the tender area for the rest of that day, it will have resolved by the next day. I am not sure how that happens, but I can assure you that is the pattern I have seen, many times.

Internal use

Internally this ancient healing plant is wonderful for soothing the digestive tract when inflammation occurs for any reason. It speeds up healing, soothes, cools, and restores. You can eat the gel straight from the leaf, with a spoon, or purchase the many refined versions found in health food shops. They will have varying degrees of preservative in, but seek out the most pure. The taste is rather bitter, but if a comfortable stomach is what you are looking for, the taste will be the least of your concern. Obviously, cereal grains are by far the main cause of inflammation in the digestive tract, but this gel is really helpful for all causes of gut inflammation.

In the inner leaf area of the plant, is the ‘latex’ or aloin. This contains high levels of a chemical called anthraquinone, which is a pretty powerful laxative, causing greater peristaltic acton of the colon. Some commercial Aloe vera juices contain this portion as well as the jelly, and others have this part removed. If you are seeking a laxative effect along with the soothing healing properties then seek out a product that contains the latex. Pregnant women, however, should not use this as the action on the colon can also activate the uterus, which is, of course, undesirable. Instead they should seek aloe gels that have had the latex/aloin/anthraquinones removed if they wish to use them internally. Of course externally all versions are safe and excellent on burns.

Conclusion

Every household should ensure they have one of these superb plants at hand, because accidents will happen! Quick, safe, cheap and reliable solutions like having fresh Aloe vera on the spot are invaluable. They look nice too.

Thanks for reading. Give me your comments and Aloe vera experiences below!

Cardiologist attacks diet dogma at 2017 Symposium

Video

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Dr Salim Yusuf speaking at the Cardiology Update 2017 symposium gives preliminary findings from the PURE study which followed 140,000 people in 17 countries, designed to address causation of cardiovascular disease.

He explains that the results indicate:

  • Greater fat intake is protective
  • Carbohydrates are harmful
  • High fat dairy is beneficial
  • Saturated fat from meat is neutral
  • Fruit is beneficial, but no additional benefit over 2 portions per day
  • Legumes are beneficial
  • 3 to 6 g/day sodium* intake optimal (vs US guidelines of 1.5g)
  • Eggs, fish and vegetables were neutral

*Edit 10/03/2017
Correction: I previously wrote 3 to 6 grams of salt per day, but have corrected this to 3 to 6 grams of sodium per day. This is equivalent to 7.5 to 15 g of salt per day.

February News Round-Up

It’s the 2nd anniversary of our News Round-Ups!

For two years we have put together a monthly distillation of the health and nutrition articles in the media. In the era of Fake News and with the declining power of traditional print media it is interesting to note that more and more of the stories are found on non-mainstream sites. Perhaps it’s time to change our header image…  

Organic Food Sales Soar

Demand for organic food is at its highest for more than a decade. The Guardian (Feb 19th). Yay!

Vitamin D

This month the vit-D story focused on the research indicating that supplements can help beat acute respiratory infections aka cold and flu’ (Sky News, Feb 16th). The identified effect was, unsurprisingly, more pronounced in people who had low levels initially.

Exercise less important than diet for avoiding weight gain

Newsweek (Feb 12th) reports on a study that found:

Exercise-focused weight loss regimens yield low success rates… This suggests calorie expenditure doesn’t really count for much.

Alzheimers linked to high blood sugar

For years I have heard researchers referring to Alzheimer’s disease as ‘type 3 diabetes’, so I was initially unsurprised by an article in Medical News Today (Feb 24th) claiming that the condition has been linked to high blood sugar. However, on closer inspection I realised this article is a bit different reporting on a study identifying a direct causal link in which glucose damages an enzyme in the pre-clinical stage. Another reminder, perhaps, why you want to avoid a high carb diet, especially refined carbs, like breakfast cereals, cake, biscuits, sweets etc.

Eating chocolate regularly linked to improved cardio metabolic health

Good news: In a study reported in Knowledge (Feb 17th) people that ate more chocolate had better liver enzymes and reduced insulin resistance than those who ate less.

Bad News: This association may be due to other associated lifestyle factors, such as higher socioeconomic status. However, the authors conclude:

Given the growing body of evidence, including our own study, cocoa-based products may represent an additional dietary recommendation to improve cardio-metabolic health.

Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs) linked to ‘silent’ kidney damage

News Medical (Feb 22nd) reports on a study that followed 125,000 new users of PPIs for 5 years. In this time nearly 10% developed chronic kidney disease or end stage renal disease. In most cases there were no early signs of kidney damage. These dangerous drugs are handed out like smarties by GPs all over the UK and USA, and elsewhere, no doubt. Acid reflux (or silent reflux as it is sometimes called, when all the patient has is a cough!) is all it takes end up with a PPI in your pocket. The main reason for acid reflux is, however, the eating of cereal grains. The solution is obvious. Cereal grains, especially wheat, can also cause kidney disease, so removing cereal grains from the diet and not taking PPIs could save many a person from real suffering and further unnecessary drugs, with their attendant side effects.

Coeliac without gut symptoms

DailyMail (February 10th) has a story about a boy who left doctors baffled after repeatedly suffering broken bones. Although he did not have the typical gut symptoms, he was eventually diagnosed with coeliac disease and placed on a gluten free diet. His bone mineral density improved, and he suffered no further breaks in the four year follow up. His older brother, who had no symptoms, was also found to have coeliac disease. The authors of the case report said: ‘It is essential to diagnose celiac disease as early as possible in order to minimise the compromise in bone health and prevent other complications of the disease. First-degree relatives should always be screened for the disease, even asymptomatic ones.’ (BMJ report here). I couldn’t agree more.

Gluten-free products may be high in heavy metals

If you read our posts on the gluten-free diet you will know that we strongly advocate replacing gluten-containing products with real foods, not ‘free-from’ versions made from other grains or unpronounceable ingredients. Science Daily (Feb 13th) reports on a study that found that people eating a gluten-free diet had arsenic levels almost twice as high for people eating a normal diet, whilst mercury levels were 70 percent higher! These toxic minerals are suspected of coming from alternative grains – especially rice – used in gluten-free biscuits, cakes, bread etc. Just eat real food, please, i.e. things without an ingredients list.

Gluten-free products like those shown on the left are promoted by coeliac charities and the NHS, but contribute to sub-standard nutrition [ref]. Real foods that are naturally free of gluten are a better choice and can lead to an overall improvement in dietary quality.

Gluten-free products like those shown on the left are promoted by coeliac charities and the NHS, but contribute to sub-standard nutrition [ref]. Real foods that are naturally free of gluten are a better choice and can lead to an overall improvement in dietary quality.

Sleep health

A Norwegian longitudinal population-based study found that over an eleven year period adults with chronic symptoms of insomnia were up to three times as likely to be diagnosed with asthma than those without sleep issues. (MedPageToday, Feb 2nd). Critics point out that the association may be either way as both conditions have multifactorial causes.

A second sleep-related study was reported in the Mail Online (Feb 9th), in which researchers found that women undergoing IVF are more likely to have a miscarriage if they have it during the spring or autumn. They believe it is due to the slight changes in the circadian rhythm – the body’s internal clock – caused by the clocks going forwards or back. The one-hour difference has previously been reported to increase the risk of heart attacks, but this study was the first of its kind to assess its impact on successful pregnancy.

Evolutionary medicine

The paleo diet is one response to the presumed mismatch between our evolved physiology and the modern world. The Independent (Feb 21st) explores a number of these ‘paleo deficits’, in an interesting article titled ‘Mismatch between the way our senses evolved and modern world is making us ill, experts warn’

Grass-fed, pasture-raised, ancestral knowledge

The Creswell Chronical (Feb 17th) has a nice interview with a researcher and author on the benefits of grass-fed meat for health. Meanwhile, the McGill Reporter (Feb 7th) has a fascinating article about the traditional animal foods of First Nations people. The article is stimulated by a pioneering encyclopedia of more than 500 animal species that form the traditional diet of First Nations has just been published online (Traditional Animal Foods of Indigenous Peoples of North America).

“The food and biodiversity knowledge of Indigenous Peoples is incredible in its depth and its breadth. Even though this publication is big, we have only scratched the surface of this knowledge,”

This remarkable work follows on from an earlier publication Traditional Plant Foods of Canadian Indigenous Peoples also available free online.

Restoring the Palaeolithic megafauna?

cave-painting
(Cave paintings of wild horse, bison and mammoth, Pech Merle cave, France. 20 thousand years old)

Are we on the way to restoring the Palaeolithic megafauna? Last month we reported on attempts to breed a wild bovine to replace the recently extinct European auroch. This month the BBCs Discover Wildlife magazine (Feb 14th) tells us that bison are being reintroduced to Banff National Park, Canada. Meanwhile, The Guardian (Feb 16th) explains how scientists are on the verge of bringing back the woolly mammoth. Crikey!

Of MICE and MUMS

mice-mum

Three pieces of health and nutrition news for mums this month… although all three studies were actually carried out on mice not women!

Adverse effects of antibiotics in (mouse) pregnancy

The Mail (Feb 9th) reports on a study that found pregnant mice who were given antibiotics had offspring who were more susceptible to pneumonia. The researchers called for a change in practice to the routine administration of antibiotics during caesarians. I could not agree more with the quote below from the study author Dr Hitesh Deshmukh who said:

It is time to begin pushing back on practices that were established decades ago, when our level of understanding was different. To prevent infection in one infant, we are exposing 200 infants to the unwanted effects of antibiotics. A more balanced, more nuanced approach is possible.

Unhealthy maternal (mouse) diet affects three generations of offspring

pregnancy-cartoonIt has been known for a number of years now that maternal diet can influence later generations via epigenetic changes.

Knowledge (Feb 17th) reports on new research which suggests that mothers who eat obesogenic diets even before becoming pregnant can predispose multiple generations to metabolic problems, even if their offspring consume healthy diets.

The researchers showed that the changes took place in ovaries prior to fertilisation and were inherited through changes to the mitochondrial DNA which is passed through the female blood line.

Our data are the first to show that pregnant mouse mothers with metabolic syndrome can transmit dysfunctional mitochondria through the female bloodline to three generations. Importantly, our study indicates oocytes – or mothers’ eggs – may carry information that programs mitochondrial dysfunction throughout the entire organism.

Pregnant (mice) should avoid drinking from plastic bottles

The Mail (Feb 7th) claims ‘pregnant women who drink from plastic bottles are more likely to have obese children’. The study they were reporting on was actually carried out in pregnant mice who were exposed to low levels of Bisphenol A (BPA) which is found in rigid polycarbonate plastics. Their offspring had reduced sensitivity to leptin

Our findings show that bisphenol A can promote obesity in mice by altering the hypothalamic circuits in the brain that regulate feeding behavior and energy balance.

Low level prenatal exposure to BPA delays a surge of leptin after birth that allows mice to develop the proper response to the hormone. BPA exposure permanently alters the neurobiology in the affected mice, making them prone to obesity as adults.

It should be pointed out that most drinks bottles are made of PET not polycarbonate, and are therefore not sources of BPA (I’ve made a table of common sources of BPA below) . PET bottles do, however, contain phthalates, but that is another story.

Sources  of BPA*
Canned foods Many cans are coated inside with BPA-containing epoxy films which can leach BPA into the food
Polycarbonate water bottles and food containers Rigid polycarbonate containers leach BPA into food and drink. Glass containers are a safer oftion.
Drinks cans As with food cans, drinks cans leach BPA, although usually at lower levels than in food cans.
Fast food Fizzy drinks and burgers from fast food outlets have been identified as significant sources of BPA
Cash register receipts Typical cash register receipts contain BPA which can be absorbed into the skin. Shop workers are at particular risk.

*Source: University Health News Daily

Fish n Chips a l’Afifah

fish-n-chips

It’s Friday tomorrow. Are you thinking fish and chips?

This is my version. None of those reheated, oxidised seed oils and wheat batter here!

  • Wild Alaskan Sockeye Salmon fillet (Waitrose)
  • Organic peas with samphire (Waitrose)
  • Broccoli with grilled sheep’s cheese (Parlick Fell, Sainsbury)
  • Chips par-boiled then roasted in goose fat

The salmon is gently pan-fried in ghee, with just a light seasoning of salt and pepper. The meal is very satisfying, even with such a small portion of chips!