Recipes – Archive

All the Recipes I’ve Posted

My Grain-Free Christmas Dinner - Our traditional Christmas dinner worked exceptionally well this year, and included roast turkey with all the trimmings. Continue reading
Grain-Free Christmas Pudding - It's the traditional pud gone paleo. Soaked fruit, almonds and honey make this rich Christmas bomb go with a bang. Continue reading
Keto Bounty Bars - Coconut filled chocolate sweet-meats that are suitable for ketogenic diets. Continue reading
Orange & almond cake - This delicious sponge is light, moist and very tasty, made with whole whizzed boiled oranges. Citrus pizzazz! Continue reading
Stuffed (Farmed) Sea Bass - A delicious baked dish using wholesome ingredients that bring out the best in this fish. Continue reading
Spiced-up nuts, four ways to make your own super-snacks - Four ideas to jazz up your nuts: Cashews with lemon and black pepper, Tamari 5-spiced mixed nuts, Curried macadamias & Balsamic pecans Continue reading
Curly kale crisps - Kale. Yes. I know. It's got a little halo, but it's... well, dull. DON'T DESPAIR! This recipe actually makes it worth eating. Continue reading
Lamb shanks with celeriac mash - One of the best cuts of lamb. A dramatic, succulent centrepiece for an English roast dinner. Continue reading
Cinnamon coconut macaroons - These little tea-time cakes have a lovely crumbly texture. Grain-free and low in carbs. Who wouldn't like them? Continue reading
Real mince meat pies - The real deal. An update on the traditional 17th century minced pie, with real minced beef (!) in a chestnut and almond shortbread case. Continue reading
Right Royal Rashers – we rate the best bacon buys ★★★★★ - We review and compare three of the best supermarket bacon buys: Pancetta, Air dried or Organic. Which will get five stars? Continue reading
Rewilded Knepp bavette steak with leak, onion and fries - Not just any old bavette steak, but Knepp's finest free-living rewilded pasture-fed longhorn steaks. PLUS video of the Knepp cattle. Continue reading
Grain-free ‘breaded’ cod with parsley sauce - A quick, easy & presentable recipe. A good alternative to battered or breaded fish. Continue reading
Ray Wings with Sauteed Summer Vegetables - A lovely fish with a delicate flavour - easy to cook and easy to eat. A light treat for summer with a medley of vegetables. Continue reading
Summer Berry Jellies - Easy to make and classy - low sugar versions of traditional English deserts, including fruit and cream jellies and blancmanges. Continue reading
10 low-carb breakfast ideas - A bunch of brekkies to get you going that will banish the munchies 'til lunchies... :-) Continue reading
Baked lemon cheese cake - A versatile low-carb baked cheesecake recipe with a grain-free base. Continue reading
Grain free bread soldiers dipping in a boiled egg Keto bread - WOW! A grain-free white loaf so you can have soldiers with your boiled egg on Easter Sunday. (Phew - Just in the nick of time!) Continue reading
Chocolate truffles - These delicious after-dinner sweetmeats are a nutritious powerhouse, and can even fit into a ketogenic diet Continue reading
Sea-food Skewers - A tasty starter: low carb and grain free. Continue reading
Five Spice Squid with Roast Aubergine - Squid tubes make a great substitute for pasta, - a real boon for a grain-free or low-carb meal Continue reading
Avocado eggs! - This dish is a revelation - eggs, cheese, avocados - what's not to like? Continue reading
Moist Lemon and Cardamom Sponge - A succulent sponge, ideal for any special occasion and without a grain in sight! Continue reading
Coconut sponge cake - Gluten free, even grain free, doesn't mean you can't bake a perfect sponge... try this one and see. Continue reading
Low carb chips, made from swede Low-Carb Chips - Low carb chips can be made from low carb root vegetables. Our favourites, and the lowest carb variety, are made from turnip or swede (rutabaga*).
Anyone for Paleo Pud? (Berry nice thank you!) - Of all the fruits we eat, berries are the closest to their wild counterparts. Here's a great way to serve them. Continue reading
Marrow Bones - Cheap, delicious and nutritious. Bone marrow was a key Palaeolithic food. Continue reading
What’s Better Than Strawberries & Cream? - ✓Low-carb ✓Gluten-free ✓Nut free ✓Ketogenic ✘Lactose-free Answer: Cream and Strawberries of course! It’s simply a matter of where you put the emphasis. Long gone are the days when I saw cream as a dangerous and indulgent addition to virtuous and … Continue reading
Keto Pancakes - One of our most popular recipes. Makes low-carb breakfasts a doddle. Continue reading
3:1 Keto Lunches - If you are eating low-carb then these lunch suggestions are easy-peasy and can be modified any way that fits your diet preferences. However, if you need to eat a truly ketogenic diet then they may need modifying a bit. Anyone attempting … Continue reading
Almond & Hazel Bread - ✓Low-carb ✓Gluten-free ✓Lactose-free (Using ghee) ✘Contains nuts This delicious grain-free, low carb bread was first served to me at Christmas by my son’s partner. She had made it up on the spot and thrown it together without measuring any ingredients. … Continue reading
Spiced Low Carb Fish Cakes - This is a very quick and flexible recipe for a posh breakfast, lunch, dinner or tea. Continue reading
Curried Eggs - a posh low-carb lunch or tea when you have guests showing off how easy and appealing this way of eating can be. Continue reading
Pork Shoulder with Garden Vegetables - This dish, like so many we eat here, is simplicity itself, yet the height of good eating. It shows why the English are famous for the (wrongly) maligned ‘meat and two veg’. Continue reading
Kombucha Brew Success! - Our first attempt at making this fermented beverage went well. Continue reading
Beautiful Biltong! - One of our foodie friends, Sally, just brought round her homemade biltong – that’s it above – and it was delicious! Her biltong is made from beef and her secret spice mix includes coriander and cumin seeds. The result is a chewy, succulent low carb snack with … Continue reading
Clarified Butter (Ghee) - I make my own clarified butter – which is called ghee in Asia – for a number of reasons: Firstly, some members of my family are allergic to cow’s milk proteins, and once carefully clarified these proteins are separated out and only the … Continue reading
Mutton, Traditional English Pot-Roast - ✓Low-carb ✓Gluten-free ✓Lactose-free (Using ghee – clarified butter) There is nothing more English than mutton. (Er, except the name – ‘Mutton’ is French. C’est la vie!) Mutton has fallen out of favour over the last half century with a swing in the preference … Continue reading
Moussaka - ✓Low-carb ✓Gluten-free ✓Cow-dairy-free (Using sheep’s cheese and goat’s butter) This traditional moussaka recipe is a classic for low-carb-high-fat diets. We have it mainly in summer and autumn when our greenhouse aubergines ripen. It is rich, savoury and melts in the mouth – very good … Continue reading
Chocolate Almond Torte - A low-carb, grain-free birthday cake fit for a king. Or your little princess for that matter. Continue reading
Poached Wild Alaskan Salmon with Wild Mushrooms - Keta salmon cooked in a clever low-carb lemon sauce, which I often use with fish dishes, and a wild mushroom vegetable accompaniment. Continue reading

Recent Posts

Salt and cardio-vascular disease: Policy and Science clash

The recent video we posted of Dr SalimYusuf’s PURE study had a section on sodium intake, where he showed that the lowest risk of cardiovascular events, cardiovascular deaths and all-cause mortality was associated with an intake between 3000 and 6000 mg of sodium per day (equivalent to 7 to 15g salt per day). The current US average sodium intake is 3800 mg placing the general population nicely within this sweet spot, although towards the lower end.

Current US and UK dietary recommendations recommend an upper limit at 2300mg of sodium (6g of salt) whilst cardiovascular recommendations by bodies such as the American Heart Association aim to reduce sodium intake to 1500 mg per day (approx 3.75 g salt). If the PURE study is right (and it is not alone in questioning the current guidelines), then these aspirations would do more harm than good.

How did such discrepancy arise? The problem may be the use of surrogate markers. The thinking goes like this: Salt raises blood pressure. Raised blood pressure increases CVD risk, so salt increases CVD risk. This kind of thinking was evident in 2011 when the American Heart Association (AHA) called for salt targets to be reduced to 1500mg per day.At the time MedPage Today explained:

The evidence linking salt intake with blood pressure — and the major adverse outcomes of heart disease, stroke, and kidney disease — is “impressive,”…

That evidence includes more than 50 trials assessing the blood pressure effects of salt, as well as a meta-analysis showing that cutting salt intake by about 1,800 mg per day lowered blood pressure by 5 mm Hg systolic and 2.7 mm Hg diastolic.

This is a “critically important public health issue,” according to Appel and colleagues, and this AHA advisory must be considered “a call to action.”

On the basis of this ‘A leads to B leads to C, therefore A leads to C’ thinking initiatives were instigated all round the world to reduce public consumption of salt. A task force of concerned scientists even formed a lobby group to put pressure on food manufacturers, which successfully led to reductions in added salt in manufactured foods.

However, within a short time of the AHA call to action reports started coming in contradicting this advice.

Over this period it is clear that scientists were becoming more and more irritated with the dogmatic approach of the AHA and government bodies, and by the last article were publicly calling the AHA anti-scientific!

Despite all of the research questioning the validity of further salt reduction US and UK policy remains stubbornly wedded to the ‘less is best trajectory’. In their 2016 survey the UK government reported proudly that average sodium consumption fell from 3500mg in 2005 to 3200 mg in 2014.

Their report claimed “Too much salt in the diet can raise blood pressure which increases the risk of heart disease and stroke. A reduction in average salt intake from 8g to 6g per day is estimated to prevent over 8000 premature deaths each year and save the NHS over £570million annually.”

Yet contrary evidence from studies including PURE would suggest that this is not simply futile but probably harmful. You would think that with the swathe of research challenging the low salt dogma that public policy would be questioning the wisdom of further reductions. Not a bit of it. Dr Alison Tedstone, chief nutritionist at Public Health England, makes no bones about it:

Our analysis makes clear that there is a steady downward trend in salt consumption. While people are having less salt than 10 years ago, we are still eating a third more than we should.

Many manufacturers and retailers have significantly reduced the salt levels in everyday foods. However, more needs to be done, especially by restaurants, cafes and takeaways.

The intransigence of health policy makers leads researchers to exasperation and despair. As one writer put it:

…the ‘salt hypothesis’ is rather like a monster from a 1950s B movie. Every time you attack it with evidence it simply shrugs it off and grows even stronger. – Malcolm Kendrick

In an interview with MedPage today researchers who found that patients with heart failure who ate more salt did better than those who ate less made the following statement which we have published before, but is such a gem it deserves another outing:

“We have had no basis for any of our recommendations regarding sodium restriction during the past 50 years, although these recommendations have changed a great deal (for no good reason). After this report, we still have no basis for any of our recommendations regarding sodium restriction. We were ignorant before; we are not any smarter now. Did we really need this report to tell us that we lack evidence for our recommendations regarding dietary sodium in patients with heart failure?”
Milton Packer, Professor in the Division of Cardiology, UT Southwestern

Further reading:

  1. Aloe vera plants – why every home should have one 2 Replies
  2. Salt vs sodium measurements Leave a reply
  3. Cardiologist attacks diet dogma at 2017 Symposium 1 Reply
  4. February News Round-Up Leave a reply
  5. Kids eat sugar. But no one knows how much. Apparently. 2 Replies
  6. Whole grains? Not a health food say these researchers Leave a reply
  7. Fish n Chips a l’Afifah 2 Replies